Zeus of Marketing


Posts filed under 'Marketing Basics'

Write for People – Not Search Engines

Final Exit Before Content Takes Over

I have been struggling over the past two weeks to identify a hot topic to write about. After coming across various blogs and articles with quotes like:

– SEO has no future.
– Constant changes in search algorithm renders real time SEM impractical if not impossible.
– Content farms are taking over search results – commoditizing SEO.
And my favorite – which became today’s blog title:
-Write for people – not search engines.

I came to the conclusion that this should be today’s topic as SEO/SEM should be archived under sciences that have lost steam  – the Alchemy of the 21st Century. My apologies to those that make their living as “key word” picking experts and a shout out to companies still adding this skill to their job descriptions. I also want to provide you with a great resource for staying up to date via State of Search particularly blogs written by Sam Crocker (@samuelcrocker).

As it it always the case, each time a fad fades, a new one emerges. The good news is that in this case the new one is not a mysterious algorithm, new math, “only a whiz kid can do it” kind of fad, but one that can be summarized in the old adage; “CONTENT IS KING.”

In the interest of a “big punch” in the fewest possible words – what is the ONE tip I have for you this week (forget a top 10 list, or even a top 5 or top 3), to truly rank high in results,  just remember:

From now on : WRITE FOR PEOPLE – NOT SEARCH ENGINES

What are the benefits:

1. Focuses on your customer interests not additional steps
2. Helps you concentrate on what you know best – your product or service
3. Frees up time to spend in identifying your customers/prospects interest and sources of information (that’s where you should be targeting your content and links to your content)

I always love when common sense prevails!!!

I would love to hear what is your point of view regarding SEO, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO COMMENT BELOW.

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

 

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4 comments June 16th, 2011

Advice for B2B : Social Media Has Been Part of Your DNA Forever : Just Embrace it With the Same Objectives and Passion

LinkedIn successful IPO (I never had any doubts) seems to have accelerated the discussion of Social Media for B2B in the “blogosphere.”  I hate to burst anyone’s bubble, but “Social Media” successful execution is based on the marketing and selling principles that B2B has executed since the first caveman bartered tyrannosaurus meat for a stone wheel.  The only difference is that the stone tools have been digitized and are now more efficient, cost-effective and in real time.

Those of you that follow my blog are familiar with my on-going message of “no need to re-invent the wheel,” just make it better. This can not be any truer than today’s topic.  A successful B2B business has reached its position through sticking to simple principles focused on delivering clear, relevant messages consistently over time to carefully selected prospects.

1. Target. Aim your marketing campaigns toward the people who most want to hear from you: Prospects with the same needs and demographics as your best customers.
-Focus on blogs, forums and LinkedIn to Identify where your prospects convene – and Listen (more inexpensive than ear-dropping in far away industry conferences)

2. Relevant. In a noisy marketplace, people tune out messages that aren’t directly relevant to their interests. Know the needs of the business decision-makers you’re targeting and tailor your messages accordingly.
-Identifying the right cyber-water cooler meetings’ locations will get rid of a lot of the noise

3. Consistent. Marketing across all channels – from paid advertising to sales letters, from websites to face-to-face presentations – should support your brand positioning and consistently repeat the same key statements about who you are, what you do, and how you do it better than anyone else.
-Social Media allows you to expand on your positioning and rather than just communicating sales bites you can develop full thought leadership articles on what makes you unique. Remember “Content is King”

4. Credible and Clear. Business prospects need to trust and believe you to recommend you or buy from you. Back up your marketing claims with case studies, testimonials, and statistics to establish credibility and position your company as a trusted provider.
– ibid (for the less literary; see above)

5. Frequent. Prospects need to hear from you regularly and often to keep you top of mind. Be visible to be memorable.
– The ease of publishing and immediate feedback will allow you to afford more frequent and relevant communication as opposed to slaving to your printers or selected trade magazine(s) editorial calendar.

When it comes to Social Media, it is B2C who should learn from B2B. Not vice-versa.

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

 

 

 

 

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1 comment June 2nd, 2011

What’s Your Brand “Persona”? Having a Personality is Critical In Social Media

Old Spice: Strong and on point

Various articles this week have mentioned that to succeed in social media an organization/brand has to interact with customers as if it was a person. To tell you the truth, it makes all the sense in the world!!! After all, when is the last time that you found yourself talking to your bowl of cereal? but,  at the same time, how many of you have a warm feeling when you see Captain Crunch, or Tony the Tiger, or for the younger crowd, good old Count Chocula? I considered the Corn Flakes colorful rooster, Cornelius, my best friend, maybe my choice to go to Cornell was a subconscious one. All these icons were most likely an offshoot of developing a brand personality for these products.

Social Media has elevated in importance the whole process in marketing of defining a brand personality. For those of us that have gone through the process, it can be a daunting one, but having participated in it for brands like Woolite, Resolve and Lysol. It helps me understand better how to put myself in these brand’s “shoes” and hold a conversation with my loyal users as if I was the brand. As a quick example,
Woolite would never engage it’s users in a mud fight but would gladly talk about a Victoria’s Secrets fashion show. Woolite is a savvy woman that knows how to take care of her clothes and dresses to the nines. She’s honest and direct and have thousands of tips on how to be like her.

As a recent example, I’m sure that you can identify Old Spice as “that guy” (Suave and Debonair) that every woman wants to be with. If you are the buyer of Old Spice who would you rather interact with, a corporate service representative script or “that guy” that seems to have the world figured out.

It is important that you train everyone in your business that creates content and engages with customers via Social Media to absorb the personality of your brand/business as if they were the best method actors in Hollywood.

The good news for you is that it is not that difficult (click here for a great resource on how to do it). For small business sometime is as easy as taking over the personality of the owner/founder which usually has rapidly permeated into the offerings of the company.

Do the homework recommended in the above link and let’s all start “friending and liking” as well as engaging with our customers as a unique persona. Its more long term and satisfying, not to mention profitable and differentiating (Marketing 101) as customers will engage for the personality  – not for the expected $1.00 off coupon. Which may still be necessary for the initial “like” but the personality will keep them coming back for more.

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

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May 12th, 2011

The “Too Much of a “Good” Thing” Rule is Alive and Well in Social Media – 5 Short Tips to Remember

No words necessary

I am sure I am not the only person that will not read one more word about Osama’s death or Price William and Kate’s Royal Wedding. How about seeing Winning!!!  one more time?  Will Lindsay’s jail sentence will finally free us from her media frenzy? While Social Media brings many opportunities to communicate with friends, partners and customers, it also helps creates an unwelcome single topic information-tsunami.  The good news is that when it comes to you, master of your brand/business, you can actively manage the communication and conversation to optimal levels.

Being Latino, I have always relied on my grandmother’s sayings when it comes to my actions (I could write a decade’s worth of blogs just on the ones I remember). I am glad that in this case there’s one in English that applies well in this situation. There’s definitely a boiling point when it comes to excesses (todo en exceso es malo), and the above mentioned subjects have definitely reached it.  When developing your Social Media content strategy please remember five key common sense rules:

1. Repetition can get old fast (another golden rule: more than three times is overkill or probably not true).
2. Change is good (People like new/fresh content).
3. Al Cesar lo que es del Cesar (People like relevant content).
4. A picture is worth a thousand words (Great attention-grabber tactic).
5. Silence is golden – but protracted can be deadly (people forget fast).

Net : Develop your communication objectives which includes a clearly defined target audience, write with relevancy to that audience (e.g., millenials do not care about continence) and try to not over post. Creating a topics calendar (weekly or bi-weekly) can also help you identify the upcoming topic and frequency by aligning it to your upcoming launches, upgrades, specials, etc.

When developing your content and communications strategy, have these short tips in mind and I am sure you will be attracting more bees with honey in no time.

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

 

 

 

 

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May 5th, 2011

Back to Basics – Turning Social Media Chaos into Marketing Utopia

For Easter/Spring Break, I want to bring back my first blog which represents the foundation to my writings in Social Media strategy. Referring back to your objectives not only keeps you grounded but also helps you maintain your direction.

It may be closer than you think

Back to Basics:

2011 should bring basic marketing principles and common sense to new media.

If you’re like me, classically trained in marketing and strategy (which includes starting my career at Procter & Gamble), I bet you’ve wondered when the focus of social media development will switch from what’s technologically feasible to what’s necessary to execute real marketing strategies and achieve real marketing objectives.

Remember A/T/U – awareness, trial, continuity of usage?

My advice for all marketers and media suppliers is to focus the development on delivering against these strategies, which are the fundamentals of any marketing effort. For example, why should Facebook focus on developing a smart phone rather than on securing strong tools for marketers and fans that successfully build awareness and community? Why is Google running in every direction and forgetting about search?

Please do not follow the trends without a clear objective. Creating a Facebook fan page or tweeting 24/7 without an objective will mean no clear metrics are set and you‘ll only be wasting your scarce resources. Trust me, this is a topic that deserves its own blog series and I intend to tackle it in the future. A whole business is emerging now on metrics as if fire has just been discovered. The main reason why there are no metrics now is because there were no objectives to begin with.

Come back to the basics. No need to re-invent the wheel!!!

If you want measurable metrics, then review your current marketing strategy and confirm your marketing objectives.

Is your objective awareness? Identify which vehicle reaches the largest amount of your target demo in an environment that is consistent with your brand promise. (Do you have your positioning statement memorized and up to date?)

To date, Facebook has the largest probability of delivering against this objective on a B2C basis. For B2B, I would stay abreast of improvements coming up on Linked In. Also, explore Linked In Groups – chances are that there are some groups already created for your industry. If not, create your own.

Is your objective trial? Identify which vehicle is closer to your point of sale and to your customer. Stay abreast of the players in the location-based, mobile space. Nothing spells trial opportunity better than receiving a high-value coupon for your product as your customer is located at the point of sale. Current players like Groupon and Four Square deserve a closer look.

Is your objective continuity of usage? Most brands are focused on this objective. Only via continuity of usage will you ensure a sustainable and profitable business.

Continuity includes not only repeat purchases, but also referrals from satisfied customers motivating others to buy. Continuity includes all the variables that lead to that cash register ringing, online shopping carts filling up, or contracts being signed. It also leads to that share of pocket increase as brand extensions or improved versions are launched.

Continuity is the result of loyalty – “the Holy Grail” for marketers. This is why CRM has been so important even in pre-Internet years. It’s also THE area where social media can shine (and few, if any, have mastered it). Leveraging social media for loyalty development is the ultimate goal for marketers in this medium, and I predict that it will be the hottest trend this year.

This is my maiden blog entry. My objective is to have a weekly entry where I can share my thoughts on social media based on sound marketing strategies rather than hype … For once, have business objectives drive technology creatively rather than vice versa. I welcome your comments, topic suggestions and questions (zeus@jrgrana.com).

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

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2 comments April 28th, 2011

How to Succeed in Social Media by Really Trying

Always Repeat a Successful Formula

I wish I could quote the classic Broadway musical, turned movie, now turned musical again, but when it comes to a successful Social Media effort,  you really need to try and try again.  Once a successful formula is found, repeat and repeat again (it worked for The Producers , West Side Story and Hairspray, not too sure if Spiderman will  “turn off the dark”).  The good news in Social Media,  leaving Hollywood and Broadway behind, is that when you have the tools figured out – it should become second nature. And then, maybe, you could write the book on “How to Succeed in Social Media Without Really Trying,” turned webinar, turned conference…you know how it goes.

Lately, I have been sensing frustration regarding Social Media in marketing cycles. Particularly, in CMO articles and blogs written over the last few weeks. Without naming names, these marketers have been going about it all wrong. Their top five mistakes include (I have included hyperlinks from previous blogs that include steps to help remedy them):

1.    Failing to execute against an overall marketing objective.

2.    Using Social Media tools for one way communication only – failing to engage the customer in a relevant conversation.

3.    Focusing on “bling” instead of substance (even with 500+ million users, Facebook is still not the most effective medium).

4.    Failure to identify a long term strategy with the social initiative (how to leverage the customer contacts).

5.    Failing to execute against an overall marketing objective, oops did I say that already?  Trust me is the most important one!!!

They say that the best way to deliver a message over time is repetition. Remember our 3+-frequency rule in media planning? With that in mind I am including a hypothetical case study in chart form that “repeats” the importance of following a Social Media Strategy.

In this hypothetical case a CPG cleaning products company has a very specific business objective: New Product Development for their disinfectant line of products, and a very innovative strategy: Using Zeus of Marketing five steps to a successful Social Media strategy process to identify new product ideas. (Just kidding on the Zeus of Marketing steps, they are good but by no means patented or unique).

SCRM: Hypothetical Example

 

While work-in-progress (I am developing this chart for an up coming whitepaper),  I wanted to share with you some insights (no pun intended) that have been surfacing as I research the topic of Social Customer Relationship Management (SCRM).

1.    Rule number one in marketing: understand you customer.  Nothing delivers more understanding than insights – and as shown in this chart, the amount of insights is inversely proportional to the amount of information as it is processed through the five steps.

2.    Social Media value is created once you have a long-term process to capture (listen), monitor, analyze and engage.

3.    The process works for all, if not most, marketing elements, product development, customer service, crisis prevention, market testing, etc. and in real time, for the near-term and for the long term as well.

4.    Social Media engagement creates a long-term relationship with your customers – can you think of any other tool that could lead to such loyalty opportunities?

In this hypothetical example, the company not only manages to achieve its new product development objective, but also identified a list of influencers, as well as,  the right venues to introduce and educate customers about their new product, once launched. Imagine how you could leverage this process for your specific objective(s).  Another piece of good news is that I am not the only one looking at the Social Media opportunities by using SCRM,  I have visited a few companies that are taking the steps and delivering best-in-class services and solutions. Feel free to contact me if you want additional information or recommendations about thought leaders in this area.

Is there hope?

In the new world of Social Media even “Spidey” has a chance.Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

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1 comment March 24th, 2011

Traffic is Just the Means to and End – Social Media Measurement

The destination better be worth it

Even the sophisticated real estate selection algorithms of McDonald’s and Wal-Mart would be rendered useless if the right objective driven data was not properly entered into each equation. Both companies use their extensive history and experience to project the kind of traffic that will optimize each new store’s revenue. Why wouldn’t you do the same thing for your Social Media efforts?

This week’s blog focus is on the final step of my recommended iterative process. You can review the first four steps in my previous blogs.

  1. Listen:
    Two Ears, One Mouth, Truism for the Ages – The Social Media Age that is.
    January 25, 2011
  2. Monitor:
    So You Are Listening, Now What???
    January 18, 2011
  3. Analyze
    “The Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living”
    January 25, 2011
  4. Engage
    “Past Dreams are Enabled by the Present to Ensure the Future”
    February 7, 2011
  5. Measure
    “Traffic is Just the Means to an End”

State of Measurement

I was disappointed and actually a little shocked, to read the latest research from eMarketer regarding the Social Media metrics used by otherwise sophisticated marketers (http://tiny.cc/bt41b). The top metric mentioned was site traffic, endorsed by 68% of 175 CMO respondents, followed by number of fans/followers, with 62.9%, and number of positive customer mentions, also at 62.9%.

Sadly, when asked about social media activities with the highest ROI:

“CMOs were most likely to say they did not know the return from any channel other than their company’s online community. Even Facebook and Ratings and reviews, the two top venues with ‘significant ROI,’ failed to win over more than about 15% of respondents”.

If you ask me, it’s time to focus on returns and real business results, or we risk missing the true value of this unique tool. Learning to measure the value of specific social media interactions is vital to properly allocating financial resources and leveraging our strategies. Every game needs a scorecard and social media is no different.

The Benefits

As clear as water:  Real results – not just bragging rights that 100,000 + liked you, but actually knowing that you increased awareness, trial or loyalty, and the cost of doing so.

How do you do it?

If you have been following my blog from the beginning, you should have a pretty good idea. Recapping:

Marketing Basics:
1.  What is your marketing objective:

Awareness: You could include a call to action, a one-question survey, or a sweepstakes entry to ensure that customers have not only passed by your page but that at least they have read it and liked it enough to have some interaction with your brand promise.

Trial: Include a coupon offer with a site-specific code. You will be able to track origins for each coupon used.

Continuity of Usage: offer reward points each time a customers comes back, makes a relevant comment, etc.

2.  Listen, Monitor, Analyze, Engage:

Track who you are reaching, where are they gathering, change in attitude from your identified influencers – you will have a base metric from where you can track changes that are relevant to moving your business.

3.  Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater

Use your existing marketing intelligence, do not ignore your current marketing experience and learnings when executing in Social Media;
Chances are that you already have some marketing intelligence on awareness to conversion ratios, or percentage discounts needed to motivate purchase, etc – use these numbers as base projections to identify metrics to measure.

Since there have been hundred page theses written about the subject of measuring ROI, I wont bore you with the details. If there is one take-away I want you to have it is this: In business you spend to get value, and you spend to understand if you are getting value from your spending, i.e. you must measure to understand what your spending is generating.

Social Media is not an Island; it is a wonderful tool that can be incorporated into what currently makes you successful. Measuring focused objectives should be a basic component of this, as well as any part of your marketing mix.

What’s next?

The good news is that you have the background behind all five steps to a successful Social Media Strategy. The not so good news is that it doesn’t end here. As mentioned, these steps are iterative, so now you have to rinse and repeat just like your favorite hair conditioner. As you measure, learn from your successes and make sure to repeat them. Also, more importantly, learn from your mistakes (and believe me we all make some) and run away from them like the plague.

As we move forward I have prepared a quick survey to ensure I keep writing about what you want to read (and take some measure on who’s listening – practice what you preach, right)? Please take a minute or two to fill it out:

http://tiny.cc/khnl0

Stay tuned for my next blog.  In the meantime, please share your thoughts below; I appreciate each and every one of your insightful comments, and I promise to pay extra attention to any opposing point of view. You can also contact me via email: zeus@jrgrana.com, Twitter: @zeusofmarketing and Facebook: Zeus of Marketing. You can also find additional contact information via LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jrgrana

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4 comments February 15th, 2011

Sorry Mad Men : PR agencies Have the Advantage in Social Media

If they only knew then...

Sorry Mad Men: PR Agencies May Have the Advantage in Social Media

In light of the recent news, I couldn’t refrain myself from blogging about Ted Williams “the homeless man with the golden voice” and draw parallels to how it would work for a product or service launch.

In the process I came to the realization that post-You Tube viral success – the media placement activities could be better executed by a good PR agency, press agent or very Innovative and fully integrated Ad Agency (not the run of the mill Madison Avenue shop). When is the last time your ad agency filmed a low budget 90 seconds video and secured interviews in every major broadcast network?

Ted William as a Parallel Case Study of The Power of Social Media and its Implementation

An hypothetical case study

Objective:

Ted Williams: Get a job as an announcer in one or more media outlets.

Brand X: Introduce a revolutionary new package

The Challenge:

Ted Williams: While Ted delivers on its promise – there’s a stigma attached to being homeless.

Brand X: While the product packaging delivers on its promise – it requires a “how-to” visual representation to truly communicate it’s differentiation.

The Strategy:

Ted Williams: Utilize YouTube for awareness and follow up with broadcast TV to add credibility and secure job offers. Spin the homelessness element as a human-interest story, particularly when released during the holiday season.  Show Ted in his current environment and secure his announcer voice is heard for a shocking juxtaposition.

Follow up via Facebook page to update fans on results and maintain momentum for continuity of employment.

Brand X: Utilize YouTube for awareness and follow up with broadcast TV to add credibility and secure purchase. Showcase the unequaled green and cost saving attributes as its main benefits.

Follow up via Facebook page to update fans on results and maintain momentum for continuity of purchase.

Measure:

Ted Williams: Metrics: Number of Job Offers

Brand X: Metrics: Sales

Take Away

I know, I know. This is way simplified:

1.  First, best estimate I have seen projects that only about 5 in 1000 videos go viral (0.5%)

2.  Broadcast Media placement requires additional investment (but that’s why I recommend taking a closer look at PR agencies with their existing experience and media contacts).

3.  For comparison purposes with other projects you may want to measure sales to exposure ratios instead of just sales.

A real brand example could be P&G’s Old Spice “the man you wish your guy smells like”, true it cost more, true it was created by Wieden + Kennedy (by no means an average Madison Avenue Ad Agency – they are in Portland BTW), but I am sure a strict marketing objective and strategy was followed (see  Old Spice: Responses Case Study-Best of 2010 Requires free registration with AdAge)

The key takeaway is that starting with an objective and following a tried and true marketing process should increase your chances of success. I believe that as of January 7, Ted had at least 3 full time job offers, within 2 months from the time the Video was shot.

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4 comments January 11th, 2011

Turning Social Media Chaos into Marketing Utopia

It may be closer than you think

Back to Basics:

2011 should bring basic marketing principles and common sense to new media.

If you’re like me, classically trained in marketing and strategy (which includes starting my career at Procter & Gamble), I bet you’ve wondered when the focus of social media development will switch from what’s technologically feasible to what’s necessary to execute real marketing strategies and achieve real marketing objectives.

Remember A/T/U – awareness, trial, continuity of usage?

My advice for all marketers and media suppliers is to focus the development on delivering against these strategies, which are the fundamentals of any marketing effort. For example, why should Facebook focus on developing a smart phone rather than on securing strong tools for marketers and fans that successfully build awareness and community? Why is Google running in every direction and forgetting about search?

Please do not follow the trends without a clear objective. Creating a Facebook fan page or tweeting 24/7 without an objective will mean no clear metrics are set and you‘ll only be wasting your scarce resources. Trust me, this is a topic that deserves its own blog series and I intend to tackle it in the future. A whole business is emerging now on metrics as if fire has just been discovered. The main reason why there are no metrics now is because there were no objectives to begin with.

Come back to the basics. No need to re-invent the wheel!!!

If you want measurable metrics, then review your current marketing strategy and confirm your marketing objectives.

Is your objective awareness? Identify which vehicle reaches the largest amount of your target demo in an environment that is consistent with your brand promise. (Do you have your positioning statement memorized and up to date?)

To date, Facebook has the largest probability of delivering against this objective on a B2C basis. For B2B, I would stay abreast of improvements coming up on Linked In. Also, explore Linked In Groups – chances are that there are some groups already created for your industry. If not, create your own.

Is your objective trial? Identify which vehicle is closer to your point of sale and to your customer. Stay abreast of the players in the location-based, mobile space. Nothing spells trial opportunity better than receiving a high-value coupon for your product as your customer is located at the point of sale. Current players like Groupon and Four Square deserve a closer look.

Is your objective continuity of usage? Most brands are focused on this objective. Only via continuity of usage will you ensure a sustainable and profitable business.

Continuity includes not only repeat purchases, but also referrals from satisfied customers motivating others to buy. Continuity includes all the variables that lead to that cash register ringing, online shopping carts filling up, or contracts being signed. It also leads to that share of pocket increase as brand extensions or improved versions are launched.

Continuity is the result of loyalty – “the Holy Grail” for marketers. This is why CRM has been so important even in pre-Internet years. It’s also THE area where social media can shine (and few, if any, have mastered it). Leveraging social media for loyalty development is the ultimate goal for marketers in this medium, and I predict that it will be the hottest trend this year.

This is my maiden blog entry. My objective is to have a weekly entry where I can share my thoughts on social media based on sound marketing strategies rather than hype … For once, have business objectives drive technology creatively rather than vice versa. I welcome your comments, topic suggestions and questions (zeus@jrgrana.com).

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14 comments January 6th, 2011

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